organic reproduction.

Modern medicine is also full of cyborgs, of
couplings between organism and machine, each
conceived as coded devices, in an intimacy and
with a power that was not generated in the
history of sexuality. Cyborg ‘sex’ restores some
of the lovely replicative baroque of ferns and
invertebrates (such nice organic
prophylactics against heterosexism). Cyborg
replication is uncoupled from organic
reproduction. Modern production seems like a
dream of cyborg colonization work, a dream that
makes the nightmare of Taylorism seem idyllic.
And modern war is a cyborg orgy, coded by C3I,
command-control-communication-intelligence, an
$84 billion item in 1984’sUS defence budget. I
am making an argument for the cyborg as a
fiction mapping our social and bodily reality
and as an imaginative resource suggesting
some very fruitful couplings. Michael Foucault’s
biopolitics is a flaccid premonition of cyborg
politics, a very open field.